Rijksmuseum van Oudheden Leiden

Archeology of the Netherlands

The history of the Netherlands covering a vast time period, from 300,000 years ago until now, based on the most important archaeological sites. A ribbon-like mold meandering through the exhibition space symbolizes the continuity of history: "What follows is always connected to its past" (Marcus Aurelius).

By displaying the objects in an ever-changing environment (the 'moving' ribbon) the attention of the audience is held longer. The objects are the starting point of the exhibition. They set the scene and tell the story. The visitor is also, following the timeline, provided with some moments of contextual and complementary information such as: projected images, based on a projection from Google Earth, portraying the transition of the finding place as it is now to the historical situation. Interactive 'encounters' provide a historical picture of family life, food and mobility. The visitor is invited as a guest at a fire place and starts a 'conversation' with natives. In alignment with the different time periods, interactive sleeping places have been created for children underneath the ribbon.

The changing environment was inspired by the changing Dutch landscape over the centuries. The change is supported by projection and sound. The audience sees or hears a bleak steppe, grain fields, moorland, a Roman road, dunes and a medieval wall.

The entire arrangement is placed semi-detached in the space. The building is owned by the Government Buildings Agency and is a national monument; the masonry walls have a monumental status.

Website RMO

Media
We Heart 25.01.2011
Frame #80 May/Jun 2011 


Realisation
Licht Joost de Beij
Mudware
Roxal
Studio Frederik de Wal

Back

Rijksmuseum van Oudheden Leiden

Archeology of the Netherlands

The history of the Netherlands covering a vast time period, from 300,000 years ago until now, based on the most important archaeological sites. A ribbon-like mold meandering through the exhibition space symbolizes the continuity of history: "What follows is always connected to its past" (Marcus Aurelius).

By displaying the objects in an ever-changing environment (the 'moving' ribbon) the attention of the audience is held longer. The objects are the starting point of the exhibition. They set the scene and tell the story. The visitor is also, following the timeline, provided with some moments of contextual and complementary information such as: projected images, based on a projection from Google Earth, portraying the transition of the finding place as it is now to the historical situation. Interactive 'encounters' provide a historical picture of family life, food and mobility. The visitor is invited as a guest at a fire place and starts a 'conversation' with natives. In alignment with the different time periods, interactive sleeping places have been created for children underneath the ribbon.

The changing environment was inspired by the changing Dutch landscape over the centuries. The change is supported by projection and sound. The audience sees or hears a bleak steppe, grain fields, moorland, a Roman road, dunes and a medieval wall.

The entire arrangement is placed semi-detached in the space. The building is owned by the Government Buildings Agency and is a national monument; the masonry walls have a monumental status.

Website RMO

Media
We Heart 25.01.2011
Frame #80 May/Jun 2011 


Realisation
Licht Joost de Beij
Mudware
Roxal
Studio Frederik de Wal

Back