Royal Palace of Brussels

Heavy Metal - Traditional Sounds from Asia

Heavy Metal - Traditional Sounds from Asia brings 82 metallophones from the Musical Instruments Museum (MIM) tot the Royal Palace. These gongs, bells, bowls and drums all come from Asia, where they play an important role in the musical culture and society.

In the royal palace with its stunning architecture and huge chandeliers in every room, the pieces are presented on low platforms inspired by scaffolds in the still waters of the orient. The surfaces of the platform feature images of typical oriental plant life, on top of which the objects are displayed. They are highlighted by means of spotlights that are housed in lanterns of rice paper. A number of objects are alternately illuminated from below and can be heard at that time. The arrangements make it seem like the squatted musicians can start a performance for the king at any moment. The emphatic green colour of the plants and the low arrangements give the space an atmosphere entirely its own while still in harmony with its surroundings.

The objects have been divided into three rooms of the museum:
  • The Crown Room with an Indonesian Gamelan setup
  • The Marble Room with an arrangement of gongs
  • The Gallery with drums and Tibetan bells


Realisation
Concepto
Ocular 
Kees van de Ven

Back

Royal Palace of Brussels

Heavy Metal - Traditional Sounds from Asia

Heavy Metal - Traditional Sounds from Asia brings 82 metallophones from the Musical Instruments Museum (MIM) tot the Royal Palace. These gongs, bells, bowls and drums all come from Asia, where they play an important role in the musical culture and society.

In the royal palace with its stunning architecture and huge chandeliers in every room, the pieces are presented on low platforms inspired by scaffolds in the still waters of the orient. The surfaces of the platform feature images of typical oriental plant life, on top of which the objects are displayed. They are highlighted by means of spotlights that are housed in lanterns of rice paper. A number of objects are alternately illuminated from below and can be heard at that time. The arrangements make it seem like the squatted musicians can start a performance for the king at any moment. The emphatic green colour of the plants and the low arrangements give the space an atmosphere entirely its own while still in harmony with its surroundings.

The objects have been divided into three rooms of the museum:
  • The Crown Room with an Indonesian Gamelan setup
  • The Marble Room with an arrangement of gongs
  • The Gallery with drums and Tibetan bells


Realisation
Concepto
Ocular 
Kees van de Ven

Back