Graphic Design Museum Breda

The permanent exhibition in the Graphic Design Museum portrays the history of this area of expertise in the Netherlands. In alignment with the rooms, three parts are setup in pre-war, post-war and recent (1980's) graphic design. The motivation of the design was to regard graphical design merely as a means of communication and expressly not as visual art. In the museum setting of the Graphic Design Museum, graphic arts should definitely not be displayed prettily. On account of that, all art is displayed in display cases and on interactive furniture.

The objects are presented in the space and have been provided with a certain context: time, place and specific assignment which allows the objects to evolve through the use of different kinds of visual information. Walls and floors of the museum are used as carriers of this information. Colour and lighting accrue from dark to light, from hall 1 to 3, much like the amount of interactivity. Lighting and multi-media react through sensors in crescendo to the visitor, to portray the increasing role of technology in society. In hall 1, sensors light up objects in the display cases, and start film projections on the walls. In hall 2, the long wall fills itself with photos of specific timeframes upon the visitor’s approach. In hall 3, 7 interactive tables are placed that show interviews with several icons of graphic design. Furthermore, there is an interactive poster wall configured to end the exhibition with a display of the status quo.

The exhibition was designed in collaboration with graphic designer Frederik de Wal.

Museum café, knowledge centre and the store are also designed by Kinkorn, with user friendliness for both visitors and museum staff in mind.


Realisation
Licht Joost de Beij
Esther Cleven
Hans Van Heeswijk architecten
Lust
Studio Frederik de Wal

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Graphic Design Museum Breda

The permanent exhibition in the Graphic Design Museum portrays the history of this area of expertise in the Netherlands. In alignment with the rooms, three parts are setup in pre-war, post-war and recent (1980's) graphic design. The motivation of the design was to regard graphical design merely as a means of communication and expressly not as visual art. In the museum setting of the Graphic Design Museum, graphic arts should definitely not be displayed prettily. On account of that, all art is displayed in display cases and on interactive furniture.

The objects are presented in the space and have been provided with a certain context: time, place and specific assignment which allows the objects to evolve through the use of different kinds of visual information. Walls and floors of the museum are used as carriers of this information. Colour and lighting accrue from dark to light, from hall 1 to 3, much like the amount of interactivity. Lighting and multi-media react through sensors in crescendo to the visitor, to portray the increasing role of technology in society. In hall 1, sensors light up objects in the display cases, and start film projections on the walls. In hall 2, the long wall fills itself with photos of specific timeframes upon the visitor’s approach. In hall 3, 7 interactive tables are placed that show interviews with several icons of graphic design. Furthermore, there is an interactive poster wall configured to end the exhibition with a display of the status quo.

The exhibition was designed in collaboration with graphic designer Frederik de Wal.

Museum café, knowledge centre and the store are also designed by Kinkorn, with user friendliness for both visitors and museum staff in mind.


Realisation
Licht Joost de Beij
Esther Cleven
Hans Van Heeswijk architecten
Lust
Studio Frederik de Wal

Back