Museum of imprisonment Veenhuizen

The building was originally used as a reformatory and was, in view of its function as this museum, austerely renovated under the direction of Mayke Schijve from the Government Buildings Agency. The permanent exhibition recounts the history of punishment from 1600 to now. The aim was to stimulate the empathy of the visitor so that they experience what it means to be a prisoner. As such, in several exhibits the visitor serves as a prisoner himself. For example, the introductory film is shown in a room closed off by bars the visitors cannot escape from until after the film.

The genuine experience of coercion and inability to use ones own free will formed the basis for this idea. Information is transferred through multi-media installations complemented by the challenge to respond to statements via a ticker. The setting is modern and interactive, not literally reconstructed interiors, but the presenting of the past through the architecture of this specific location. This coincides with the subject ‘pauper paradise Veenhuizen’ and also partly with the subject of detention as punishment. There are arrangements with authentic objects such as metal cages with a hammock where visitors can see how much space, privacy and comfort a resident in Veenhuizen had, or the abstraction of a dome prison the visitor can stand in.

The 150 meter (500 ft.) long sight lines along the inner walls of the horseshoe-shaped building are maintained by placing all objects and spatial exhibits free from the outer wall. Special climate-controlled rooms and showcases were designed with curator requirements taken into account.

The Prison Museum Veenhuizen was the Historical Newspaper's Museum-test winner with a big fat 9 out of ten. Historical Newspaper report: “An experience!” “Exciting” and “This museum is educational, entertaining and provides food for thought "


Realisation
Kiss the Frog
Nota Bene
Rijksgebouwendienst Architect - Mayke Schijve

Back

Museum of imprisonment Veenhuizen

The building was originally used as a reformatory and was, in view of its function as this museum, austerely renovated under the direction of Mayke Schijve from the Government Buildings Agency. The permanent exhibition recounts the history of punishment from 1600 to now. The aim was to stimulate the empathy of the visitor so that they experience what it means to be a prisoner. As such, in several exhibits the visitor serves as a prisoner himself. For example, the introductory film is shown in a room closed off by bars the visitors cannot escape from until after the film.

The genuine experience of coercion and inability to use ones own free will formed the basis for this idea. Information is transferred through multi-media installations complemented by the challenge to respond to statements via a ticker. The setting is modern and interactive, not literally reconstructed interiors, but the presenting of the past through the architecture of this specific location. This coincides with the subject ‘pauper paradise Veenhuizen’ and also partly with the subject of detention as punishment. There are arrangements with authentic objects such as metal cages with a hammock where visitors can see how much space, privacy and comfort a resident in Veenhuizen had, or the abstraction of a dome prison the visitor can stand in.

The 150 meter (500 ft.) long sight lines along the inner walls of the horseshoe-shaped building are maintained by placing all objects and spatial exhibits free from the outer wall. Special climate-controlled rooms and showcases were designed with curator requirements taken into account.

The Prison Museum Veenhuizen was the Historical Newspaper's Museum-test winner with a big fat 9 out of ten. Historical Newspaper report: “An experience!” “Exciting” and “This museum is educational, entertaining and provides food for thought "


Realisation
Kiss the Frog
Nota Bene
Rijksgebouwendienst Architect - Mayke Schijve

Back